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Second life furry sex video

Second life furry sex video

This article was downloaded by: To cite this article: The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the use of the Content. This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes.

Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden.

Cannon Cyberspace has often been regarded as a place where gender and sexual identities can be reformed in liberatory ways. Unfortunately, there is a good deal of online sexual and gender play that objectifies women and marginalizes queer identities.

Therefore, we argue for an alternative critical approach to the study of gender and sexuality in cyberspace, one that views the agency of interactive media from the perspective of docility. In this article, we critically examine gender and sex practices in the online virtual environment Second Life.

We conclude that while sexual and gender norms may be resisted in cyberspace, these same norms can also be reproduced in ways that are retrograde.

It could be classified with other massive multiplayer online role-playing games MMORPGs , because it shares several characteristics with these games. Multiple users from all over the world log onto SL and interact in a virtual environment. First, there are no clearly defined role-play objectives in SL: Second, while the producers of many online commercial games discourage players from changing the elements of the game, users in SL are encouraged to manipulate the environment Bartle, Although Linden Lab, the creative force behind SL, has established some rules and guidelines, users are able to build their own buildings, create their own clothing and accessories, and are usually at liberty to shape this virtual world in any way they see fit.

An earlier version of this article received the top paper award from the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Caucus at the Central States Communication Association, on April 9, Given the liberty available in SL, users have the opportunity to create new relationships, and create those relationships in new and different ways.

Other SL users, however, reproduce traditional gender roles and sexual norms, and sometimes do so in disturbing ways. We see SL as a valuable space in which to study gender and sexuality in cyberspace, because unlike traditional forms of print, film, or television media hereafter, traditional media , SL users are primarily responsible for the content.

In other words, users have the agency to create the gender roles and the sexual experiences that they want. In many of the existing studies of gender and sexuality in cyberspace, this agency is theorized from a liberatory perspective that sees cyberspace as a unique social arena in which traditional gender roles and sexual norms are challenged and transgressed.

Unfortunately, this theoretical perspective does not account for those who use their agency to reproduce the traditional roles and norms found in real life RL. Our perspective is designed to offer a critical alternative to the prevalent liberatory perspective, and we begin this essay by reviewing how this perspective developed. We will then analyze examples found in SL where some users of this virtual environment have created content that sexually objectifies women and marginalizes sexual minorities.

The idea that cyberspace is a liberatory environment is certainly not new, and other scholars have challenged this idea Gunkel, When scholars first began studying relationships in cyberspace, there was a great deal of optimism about the potential for virtual environments to offer users opportunities to explore multiple identities. For example, Sherry Turkle looked at how users switched genders in online social environments, and how this gender switching allowed these users to assert new identities, and develop more empathy for the opposite gender.

She claims that R. Cannon Downloaded by [Ball State University] at For example, Joshua Berman and Amy Bruckman used the Turing game to study gender switching in an online environment.

Still, Berman and Bruckman , p. In a similar study of the Turing game, Lotte Nyboe , argues that the gender play in cyberspace can destablize sexual norms. Nyboe makes special note of a male heterosexual subject who successfully played the game, convincing the players that he was a woman. As these studies indicate, cyberspace is thought to liberate the subject from the embodied constraints of RL. This liberatory perspective, however, teeters on the brink of technological determinism, and unfortunately cyberspace does not always provide an escape.

Lynne Roberts and Malcolm Parks have conducted one of the few social science studies about gender switching in cyberspace, and they found that the majority of people do not switch genders online.

In addition, they found that some women switched genders in order to escape sexual harassment online. In these cases, gender switching may allow these women to escape, but this escape is merely a reaction to the reproduction of problematic RL sexual relations in cyberspace.

This is not to suggest that cyberspace has not facilitated the potential for liberatory use. Indeed, scholars who have analyzed interactive online media contend that cyberspace has opened up opportunities for political resistance and community building, particularly for individuals with queer identities Alexander, ; Bryson, In spite of these positive findings, other scholars have begun to identify problems.

In addition, Mary Bryson et al. Finally, in her own analysis of video games, Mia Consalvo , p. In contrast to this liberatory perspective, queer scholars of traditional media have approached the representation of gender and sexuality with a healthy skepticism.

For almost two decades, queer media scholars have examined how gender and sexual norms are reproduced, and how representation can function to exclude or contain Sex Lives in Second Life Downloaded by [Ball State University] at These studies focused on traditional forms of media, in which the agency of representation is in the hands of media producers.

New media scholars, however, are often quick to point out that users have the agency of production where interactive media is concerned, and they maintain that this shift in agency is a significant difference.

Interactivity and the Docile Body In the studies of interactive media generally, a great deal has been written about the agency of the user. It is often the implicit assumption of queer scholars that traditional forms of media will cater to established norms in order to attract the broadest audience. While interactivity might create different relationships between users and media producers, interactivity does not categorically remove users from the influence of this social matrix.

For example, users in SL create their own characters avatars , give them primary and secondary sex characteristics, dress them and determine their sexual practices.

Indeed, when it comes to the construction of gender and sexuality in SL, the users exercise a great deal of control. These users, however, represent subjects whose identities have been formed by the way gender and sexuality are disciplined in society. In The History of Sexuality, Vol. In this discourse sexual practice became an indicator of the psychological health of the individual, because sexuality was thought to reside in the psyche of the individual.

Consequently, the individual was invested with the responsibility of maintaining proper sexual practices, and seeking out help for perverse sexual behavior. In this way, the supposed social repression of sexuality resulted in a repression of sexuality within the psyche of the individual. Once sexuality was invested in the person, individuals aligned their sexual practices with established norms, and actively assumed the responsibility for their own sexual health.

The concept R. She argues that individuals must constantly perform established gender norms in order to escape the social discipline that is exercised against queer sexuality. In the repetition of the performance, the performativity of gender is forgotten, and the embodiment of gender norms is thought to be an expression of internal identity; in this way the gendered subject becomes a docile body.

Theorizing from Foucault and Butler, a fundamental problem with the liberatory perspective emerges. Although the disciplining of gender and sexuality may be exercised on the body, this discipline produces a sexual subject who imagines itself independent of the body.

Liberating this subject from the body via cyberspace does not necessarily mean that this subject escapes the influential disciplinary practices that produced its identity. For example, Miroslaw Filiciak , p. Docility helps explain why individuals empowered with the agency to produce their own.

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Furry Cyber Sex Lounge Part 1



Second life furry sex video

This article was downloaded by: To cite this article: The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the use of the Content. This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes.

Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden.

Cannon Cyberspace has often been regarded as a place where gender and sexual identities can be reformed in liberatory ways. Unfortunately, there is a good deal of online sexual and gender play that objectifies women and marginalizes queer identities. Therefore, we argue for an alternative critical approach to the study of gender and sexuality in cyberspace, one that views the agency of interactive media from the perspective of docility. In this article, we critically examine gender and sex practices in the online virtual environment Second Life.

We conclude that while sexual and gender norms may be resisted in cyberspace, these same norms can also be reproduced in ways that are retrograde. It could be classified with other massive multiplayer online role-playing games MMORPGs , because it shares several characteristics with these games.

Multiple users from all over the world log onto SL and interact in a virtual environment. First, there are no clearly defined role-play objectives in SL: Second, while the producers of many online commercial games discourage players from changing the elements of the game, users in SL are encouraged to manipulate the environment Bartle, Although Linden Lab, the creative force behind SL, has established some rules and guidelines, users are able to build their own buildings, create their own clothing and accessories, and are usually at liberty to shape this virtual world in any way they see fit.

An earlier version of this article received the top paper award from the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Caucus at the Central States Communication Association, on April 9, Given the liberty available in SL, users have the opportunity to create new relationships, and create those relationships in new and different ways. Other SL users, however, reproduce traditional gender roles and sexual norms, and sometimes do so in disturbing ways.

We see SL as a valuable space in which to study gender and sexuality in cyberspace, because unlike traditional forms of print, film, or television media hereafter, traditional media , SL users are primarily responsible for the content. In other words, users have the agency to create the gender roles and the sexual experiences that they want. In many of the existing studies of gender and sexuality in cyberspace, this agency is theorized from a liberatory perspective that sees cyberspace as a unique social arena in which traditional gender roles and sexual norms are challenged and transgressed.

Unfortunately, this theoretical perspective does not account for those who use their agency to reproduce the traditional roles and norms found in real life RL. Our perspective is designed to offer a critical alternative to the prevalent liberatory perspective, and we begin this essay by reviewing how this perspective developed. We will then analyze examples found in SL where some users of this virtual environment have created content that sexually objectifies women and marginalizes sexual minorities.

The idea that cyberspace is a liberatory environment is certainly not new, and other scholars have challenged this idea Gunkel, When scholars first began studying relationships in cyberspace, there was a great deal of optimism about the potential for virtual environments to offer users opportunities to explore multiple identities.

For example, Sherry Turkle looked at how users switched genders in online social environments, and how this gender switching allowed these users to assert new identities, and develop more empathy for the opposite gender.

She claims that R. Cannon Downloaded by [Ball State University] at For example, Joshua Berman and Amy Bruckman used the Turing game to study gender switching in an online environment. Still, Berman and Bruckman , p. In a similar study of the Turing game, Lotte Nyboe , argues that the gender play in cyberspace can destablize sexual norms. Nyboe makes special note of a male heterosexual subject who successfully played the game, convincing the players that he was a woman.

As these studies indicate, cyberspace is thought to liberate the subject from the embodied constraints of RL. This liberatory perspective, however, teeters on the brink of technological determinism, and unfortunately cyberspace does not always provide an escape.

Lynne Roberts and Malcolm Parks have conducted one of the few social science studies about gender switching in cyberspace, and they found that the majority of people do not switch genders online.

In addition, they found that some women switched genders in order to escape sexual harassment online. In these cases, gender switching may allow these women to escape, but this escape is merely a reaction to the reproduction of problematic RL sexual relations in cyberspace.

This is not to suggest that cyberspace has not facilitated the potential for liberatory use. Indeed, scholars who have analyzed interactive online media contend that cyberspace has opened up opportunities for political resistance and community building, particularly for individuals with queer identities Alexander, ; Bryson, In spite of these positive findings, other scholars have begun to identify problems. In addition, Mary Bryson et al.

Finally, in her own analysis of video games, Mia Consalvo , p. In contrast to this liberatory perspective, queer scholars of traditional media have approached the representation of gender and sexuality with a healthy skepticism.

For almost two decades, queer media scholars have examined how gender and sexual norms are reproduced, and how representation can function to exclude or contain Sex Lives in Second Life Downloaded by [Ball State University] at These studies focused on traditional forms of media, in which the agency of representation is in the hands of media producers.

New media scholars, however, are often quick to point out that users have the agency of production where interactive media is concerned, and they maintain that this shift in agency is a significant difference.

Interactivity and the Docile Body In the studies of interactive media generally, a great deal has been written about the agency of the user. It is often the implicit assumption of queer scholars that traditional forms of media will cater to established norms in order to attract the broadest audience.

While interactivity might create different relationships between users and media producers, interactivity does not categorically remove users from the influence of this social matrix. For example, users in SL create their own characters avatars , give them primary and secondary sex characteristics, dress them and determine their sexual practices.

Indeed, when it comes to the construction of gender and sexuality in SL, the users exercise a great deal of control. These users, however, represent subjects whose identities have been formed by the way gender and sexuality are disciplined in society.

In The History of Sexuality, Vol. In this discourse sexual practice became an indicator of the psychological health of the individual, because sexuality was thought to reside in the psyche of the individual. Consequently, the individual was invested with the responsibility of maintaining proper sexual practices, and seeking out help for perverse sexual behavior. In this way, the supposed social repression of sexuality resulted in a repression of sexuality within the psyche of the individual.

Once sexuality was invested in the person, individuals aligned their sexual practices with established norms, and actively assumed the responsibility for their own sexual health. The concept R. She argues that individuals must constantly perform established gender norms in order to escape the social discipline that is exercised against queer sexuality. In the repetition of the performance, the performativity of gender is forgotten, and the embodiment of gender norms is thought to be an expression of internal identity; in this way the gendered subject becomes a docile body.

Theorizing from Foucault and Butler, a fundamental problem with the liberatory perspective emerges. Although the disciplining of gender and sexuality may be exercised on the body, this discipline produces a sexual subject who imagines itself independent of the body.

Liberating this subject from the body via cyberspace does not necessarily mean that this subject escapes the influential disciplinary practices that produced its identity. For example, Miroslaw Filiciak , p. Docility helps explain why individuals empowered with the agency to produce their own.

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  1. This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Multiple users from all over the world log onto SL and interact in a virtual environment.

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